Photo:  Paul Chiu/SPES


Exploring Approaches to Teaching Outdoors 

Join SPES educators for an experiential, educational and inspirational outdoor workshop in beautiful Stanley Park. Increase your knowledge of ecology and learn ways to teach curriculum outdoors while engaging your students in nature. Learn field-tested activities and techniques to use in local parks or on your school grounds.

If you have never taken students outside on an educational adventure or don’t do it regularly, this workshop will give you the tools to do so with increased confidence.  The workshop is geared towards teachers and student teachers teaching at a kindergarten to grade seven level and will include links to the BC curriculum at this level.

The workshop will take place outdoors, rain or shine. Please wear suitable footwear and weather appropriate clothing.


Please contact us at school@stanleyparkecology.ca or 604-257-6908 ext: 103 for more details. 

If no tickets area available, sign up on our waitlist here


This program will follow approved COVID protocols, and attendees must respect these protocols to participate in the program.  All participants must pre-register – NO DROP-INS ALLOWED.  To make everyone comfortable, we will encourage distancing and will be keeping numbers low to accommodate this.   


This program will meet at the Stanley Park bus loop. 

  

*By reserving a ticket, you are confirming you have read, understood, and agree to follow all COVID-19 protocols found here.  Participants must include a telephone number and email address for contact tracing.   

 

We gratefully acknowledge that the land on which we gather and help steward is the unceded and traditional territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) Nation, and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nation. Since time immemorial, Coast Salish peoples have lived reciprocally with the land, harvesting and cultivating foods and medicines and practicing ceremony. The abundance of these lands and waters, which enables us to live, work, and play here today, is a result of the past and on-going stewardship and advocacy of the Coast Salish peoples.