Photo:  Paul Chiu (SPES)

WEBINAR

This workshop will cover ways to engage your students in nature, and tips and tricks to help outdoor education become more comfortable for you. Educators will provide information to help increase your knowledge of local ecology. We will also share activities, educational games, and resources that help connect your lessons to the BC curriculum while teaching outdoors at local parks or on school grounds.

This workshop is designed to help everyone become more comfortable and confident teaching outdoors. Whether taking students outside is a regular occurrence in your classroom, or something new you would like to introduce, this workshop will have insights and tools for you!

*Tickets must be purchased in advance. Fees for this program are based on a sliding scale, to keep them accessible to more people - you choose what you can afford! As a non-profit that subsidizes our programs for increased accessibility, your contributions make a huge difference in being able to offer our services for the years to come. Thank you for your support! 

**This program will take place on Zoom, please make sure you have Zoom downloaded well in advance of the webinar.  A Zoom link can be found within your confirmation email, and will also be sent out one hour before the start of the program. Only one ticket required per household.

*** Please note, this program will only run if we have 10 or more participants. We will be issuing full refunds if we do not get enough sign ups. 


Please contact us at school@stanleyparkecology.ca or 604-257-6908 ext:103 for more details.


We gratefully acknowledge that the land on which we gather and help steward is the unceded and traditional territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) Nation, and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nation. Since time immemorial, Coast Salish peoples have lived reciprocally with the land, harvesting and cultivating foods and medicines and practicing ceremony. The abundance of these lands and waters, which enables us to live, work, and play here today, is a result of the past and on-going stewardship and advocacy of the Coast Salish peoples.